Developing iOS Applications

This course is designed for software programmers who are getting into iOS development. It will introduce you to iOS app development in Swift, a new programming language from Apple, and serves as your launching point for mobile development.

Schedule

  • Self-Paced Free online course 10 weeks
    4-5 hours per week

Licenses

Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial ShareAlike

Highlights

This is a curated course with expert assistance offered free of cost.

You can view lectures at your convenience and finish assessments anytime before the deadlines.

Subject Experts will conduct regular doubt clarification sessions.

You will get a digital certificate once you complete the course.

Experience our next generation platform where you can learn and collaborate with your peers seamlessly.

This course doesn't need any background or requirements.

About the course

This course will introduce you to the aspects of user interface design for mobile devices and the unique user interactions using multi-touch technologies. It will cover the concepts of Object-oriented design using model-view-controller paradigm, memory management, Objective-C programming language, object-oriented Database API, animation, multi-threading and performance considerations. We will be using the tools and APIs required to build applications for the iPhone and iPad platform using the iOS SDK.

WHAT DO YOU NEED TO BE FAMILIAR WITH?

C language and object-oriented programming experience.

IS THIS COURSE RIGHT FOR YOU?

Professionals and students who are interested in creating basic iOS applications and using that knowledge to create sophisticated Apps in future.

Curriculum

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faqs

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Disclaimer

The video lectures used in this course are from public domain which is under creative common license. We do not have any affiliation nor any relation with the content author(s) or its associated institution(s). This work by Stanford University is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License. Based on a work at cs193p.stanford.edu.